Book Review: Hex by Thomas Olde Heuvelt

September 21, 2021 – Alli Boyer, Adult Services

I don’t know about you, but I’m already over summer and am counting down the days until cooler weather. With cooler weather comes my favorite holiday, which is Halloween. Of course, Halloween is the perfect time for scary stories, but I try not to limit my horror to just that season. If you’re looking to jumpstart your anxiety, here’s a good read you should check out:
Hex by Thomas Olde Heuvelt.To start off, I should tell you that while I LOVE scary stories, I do get extremely scared. It doesn’t even take much. I have an overactive imagination and an aversion to turning on my lights, which doesn’t mix well with horror fiction.

To start off, I should tell you that while I LOVE scary stories, I do get extremely scared. It doesn’t even take much. I have an overactive imagination and an aversion to turning on my lights, which doesn’t mix well with horror fiction.
So, basically, Hex takes place in the town of Black Spring, which just so happens to be haunted by the Black Rock Witch. The Black Rock Witch is from the 17th century, and her eyes and mouth are all sewn shut, and she walks the town, entering homes and standing at the bedsides of the town’s residents. There are two main conflicting forces in the book, apart from the ghostly entity. On one side are the town’s elders, who don’t want anyone to leave the town and don’t want the outside world knowing about the Black Rock Witch in the hopes that their curse won’t spread and the witch will be confined to just the town. These elders also created the organization called HEX, which monitors the many, many surveillance cameras in town and enforces the quarantine and restrictions. On the other side is a group of teens who are fed up with the mandatory quarantine and decide to post sightings of the witch online, which ends up angering both the elders and the witch, and so many things go wrong from there.
While the witch may seem like the scarier antagonist, as with most scary stories, there’s always more to their backstories than originally meets the eye. The real antagonist of the story, in my opinion, are the town elders – both the past and present elders. The past elders are horrible old men who basically caused the town’s problems, and the current elders are horrible old men who resort back to 17th century customs to try to regain control of the town. I really admired the teens in this town – they’re brave and smart and just completely over it. This book is a little bit older, so I know that Gen Z is not the model for these teens, but honestly, they reminded me of Gen Z. I know that generation gets a bad rap, but I really do admire them. For the most part, they’re way braver than I was at that same age, and I can definitely picture them as the heroes in this story. Overall, I really love Hex and you should go read it.

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